The quick reference guide to Apple's keynotes
Inventio

 

Hi, I'm Chadwick Severn. I'm a web and app developer, currently typing in England, but will be moving back to Canada shortly. I was lucky enough to be selected by the Úll organizers to give a lightning talk in 2015 and to build one-day pop-up Apple-themed escape rooms in 2016 and 2017.

There's tons of Apple web sites out there, and certainly lots that chronicle Apple's keynotes, but I couldn't find any that actually indexed them, showing you at a glance all of them by year, allowing you to easily see which were the ones where AirPorts were announced, which ones had women on stage, which ones had swearing, and which ones had nudity. The next time you hear on a podcast someone ask "When was the last time the Mac Mini appeared at an Apple keynote?", you know where to go before you hit that feedback form.

I'm not sure where on the "1. Shut-it-down letter from Bruce Sewell" to "10. Invited to have lunch with Phil Schiller" Apple Reaction Scale this site officially lies, but I've got my fingers crossed that I at least get to "5. Ignore"

If you're keen to contact me, it's easy to do so by pinging @NotesKey on Twitter. If you've got a question to ask me, let me see if I can assuage that first with these ready-to-go answers:

What's with those Latin words all over the place? Well, you philistine, the five canons of rhetoric are Inventio, Dispositio, Elocutio, Memoria, and Pronuntiatio, and roughly translate as Discovery, Organization, Oration, Memory, and Delivery. These terms matched up precisely with how I wanted to organize the keynote pages, and gives me an excuse to use a fancy font.

Speaking of fonts, what fonts am I using? When Daring Fireball's John Gruber wrote about a beautiful new monospace font called Operator offered by Hoefler&Co, I instantly knew I had to use it in my next project. I built the site, felt it was a little too monospacey, and switched to their Sentinel, Whitney Narrow, Historicals, and Numbers fonts instead.

For the links to videos of the keynotes, am I trying to steer people to certain YouTube accounts? No, I simply tried to find the best quality version of each keynote available on the web, with the fewest number of edits and muted segments. When the video isn't available, I'll go off of transcripts, and if those aren't available, I'll try my best to cobble together some information from archive.org's copy of the Apple web site and from Apple news sources like TidBITS and Macworld.

I can already hear you saying that I missed some keynotes like Power of X, QuickTime Live, NAB, State of the Unions, PhotoPlus, and all the ones before 1997. To that I say that my goal was to cover the primary Apple keynotes aimed at the press and general public. For anything outside of that scope, in the immortal words of Apple marketing: "We have nothing to announce at this time."

If you're still keen to write more than 140 characters to me, my email is chad at the domain of this website. Please note the spam filters are especially strong on this account, so please don't get upset if your email bounces, Bruce Sewell.